Tagged: language

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Humour that hurts and harms

The following opinion piece was originally published on stuff.co.nz on 2 June 2017. If you missed the International Day Against Homophobia the other day, I doubt you were alone. On the other hand, it...

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Anyone for a cup of tea?

Without a doubt, human language is original and highly creative. There seem to be almost no limits to the many and varied ways in which we can express ourselves. However, while we certainly can...

about Anna Siyanova

Anna works in the fields of second language acquisition, corpus linguistics, psycholinguistics, neurolinguistics, and sociolinguistics. Anna’s research interests include cognitive and psychological aspects of second language acquisition, bilingualism, learner corpus research, usage-based theories, phraseology, L1 and L2 mental lexicon, vocabulary. More specifically, Anna’s research investigates acquisition, processing, and use of multi-word expressions (idioms, collocations, binomials, lexical bundles, multi-word verbs, speech routines, etc.) in a first and second language.

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“it’s just kinda language”

That was Cabinet minister Paula Bennett about half-way through an interview with RadioNZ journalist John Campbell last night. She was being pressed about a dividend to be paid – or not – to the...

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Symposium talks online

Here’s something to listen to over the morning coffee. A symposium on Intergenerational Transmission of Minority Languages was held at the University of Canterbury in December, and the organisers made great use of technology. As a...

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English for sophistication

Native speakers of English don’t automatically associate their language with connotations of style. In New Zealand, for example, linguistic landscape research has found French & Italian associated with cafés and restaurants, American English with...

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BBC English, language & gender

This year’s Ian Gordon Fellow is Professor Deborah Cameron, the Rupert Murdoch Professor of Language and Communication at Oxford University. She’s a sociolinguist and discourse analyst, whose research interests include language attitudes, media language and the...

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Rhetoric Lives in Government Policy Writing! (Neology)

Neology is not strictly speaking a term from Greek rhetoric, even though it is derived from Greek language elements. It refers to the inventing of new words or expressions, and it can also refer...

about Derek Wallace

Derek Wallace is director of the writing programme (academic and professional writing) in the School of Linguistics and Applied Language Studies. Derek's research interests, most of which are interrelated, include: Rhetoric of public policy development; discourses of temporality; techniques for managing the future; discourses of historical interpretation; theory and practice of technology; changes in stylistic and editing conventions; and legal discourse.

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Rhetoric Lives in Government Policy Writing! (Tautology)

We are taught that tautology (repetitive, superfluous expression) is something we should avoid in writing. An exception, in practice, is legal writing, where the holy grail of precision (as distinct from concision) is sometimes...

about Derek Wallace

Derek Wallace is director of the writing programme (academic and professional writing) in the School of Linguistics and Applied Language Studies. Derek's research interests, most of which are interrelated, include: Rhetoric of public policy development; discourses of temporality; techniques for managing the future; discourses of historical interpretation; theory and practice of technology; changes in stylistic and editing conventions; and legal discourse.

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Rhetoric Lives in Government Policy Writing! (Enthymeme)

The ancient Greeks have been credited with inventing rhetoric. In those days, rhetoric meant the use of verbal strategies in the service of effective persuasion, not the use of fine-sounding but empty talk by...

about Derek Wallace

Derek Wallace is director of the writing programme (academic and professional writing) in the School of Linguistics and Applied Language Studies. Derek's research interests, most of which are interrelated, include: Rhetoric of public policy development; discourses of temporality; techniques for managing the future; discourses of historical interpretation; theory and practice of technology; changes in stylistic and editing conventions; and legal discourse.

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Just horsing around?

There was a time when people used to disparage those who tried to use language to change things. Feminists who promoted the use of less sexist language, for example, were often criticised though few...

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Using Language to Poke Fun

By Keely Kidner, a taste of her recently completed PhD Given the seriousness of climate change and its devastating effects, you’d be forgiven for thinking that environmental activists have little use for humour. But...

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Shouting at the Telly

Let’s start with a confession. Sometimes I talk back to the television. Sometimes I talk back really loudly. I think what sets me off is when something is really wrong. Maybe factually wrong, but...